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BACS E-News December 2006 PDF Print E-mail
Contents

1. Eccles Centre Visiting Professor in North American Studies
2. Eccles Centre Visiting Fellows in North American Studies
3. Eccles Centre Postgraduate Awards in North American Studies
4. GBS by Jason Hall,  21 November - 9 December 2006
5. Nouvelles vues sur le cin
qucois no 8, Fall 2007, Call for proposals
6. International Journal of Francophone Studies, forthcoming themed issue


1. Eccles Centre Visiting Professor in North American Studies


One award to be made to a post-doctoral scholar normally resident in the USA or Canada whose research, in any field of North American Studies, entails the use of the British Library collection.  The award holder must plan to be in research residence at the British Library for a minimum of three months.  The British Library website, including public access to the catalogues, can be found at http://www.bl.uk

Enquiries regarding North American holdings can be directed in the first instance to Dr Matthew Shaw (US curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it , Dr Dorian Hayes (Canadian curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or to the Eccles Centre This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Award: 6,000 for travel and other expenses connected with the recipient's time spent in London as the Eccles Centre Visiting Professor.
No extra funding will be available from this source.  Candidates must ensure that they have sufficient funds to cover they own needs and the needs of any dependants during their stay.
None of the organisations or individuals connected with this award are in a position to offer awards holders advice or help in matters of arranging accommodation or travel.
The award holder will be entitled to an award of 6,000 for travel and other expenses connected with the research visit to London.  The detailed administration of this award will be managed by the British Association for American Studies.  The award holder will have privileged access to the collections and the curatorial expertise of the British Library.
The award holder will agree to acknowledge the support provided by the Eccles Centre Visiting Professorship in any publication resulting from this research visit, and to inform the Eccles Centre of such publications.  If the opportunity arises, it is expected that the award holder will present their work at an appropriate Eccles Centre/British Library seminar or conference.

Applications should be in the form of a brief CV (no more than two pages), and a document explaining the nature of the North American Studies research being proposed at the British Library (no more than two pages).
FOUR Applications must reach Dr. Ian Scott, English and American Studies Subject Area, School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK by Friday January 26th, 2007 for research visits to take place in the period March-December 2007.  Applications by fax will not be accepted but email attachment will This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it so long as it conforms to the guidelines set out above.

2. Eccles Centre Visiting Fellows in North American Studies

Three awards to be made to post-doctoral scholars normally resident in the UK, outside the M25, whose research, in any field of North American Studies, entails the use of the British Library collection.  The award holder must plan to be in research residence at the British Library for a minimum of one month.  The British Library website, including public access to the catalogues, can be found at http://www.bl.uk

Enquiries regarding North American holdings can be directed in the first instance to Dr Matthew Shaw (US curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Dr Dorian Hayes (Canadian curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or to the Eccles Centre This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Award: 2,000 for travel and other expenses connected with the recipient's time spent in London as the Eccles Centre Visiting Fellow.
No extra funding will be available from this source.  Candidates must ensure that they have sufficient funds to cover their own needs and the needs of any dependants during their period as an Eccles Centre Fellow.
None of the organisations or individuals connected with this award are in a position to offer awards holders advise or help in matters of arranging accommodation or travel.
The award holder will be entitled to an award of 2,000 for travel and other expenses connected with the research visit to London.  The detailed administration of this award will be managed by the British Association for American Studies.  The award holder will have privileged access to the collections and the curatorial expertise of the British Library.
The award holder will agree to acknowledge the support provided by the Eccles Centre Visiting Professorship in any publication resulting from this research visit, and to inform the Eccles Centre of such publications.  If the opportunity arises, it is expected that the award holder will present their work at an appropriate Eccles Centre/British Library seminar or conference.

Applications should be in the form of a brief CV (no more than two pages), and a document explaining the nature of the North American Studies research being proposed at the British Library (no more than two pages).
FOUR Applications must reach Dr. Ian Scott, English and American Studies Subject Area, School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK by Friday January 26th, 2007 for research visits to take place in the period March-December 2007.  Applications by fax will not be accepted but email attachment will This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it so long as it conforms to the guidelines set out above.

3. Eccles Centre Postgraduate Awards in North American Studies

At least five awards to be made to graduate students normally resident in the UK, outside the M25, whose research, in any field of North American Studies, entails the use of the British Library collection.  The British Library website, including public access to the catalogues, can be found at http://www.bl.uk
Enquiries regarding North American holdings can be directed in the first instance to Dr Matthew Shaw (US curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it , Dr Dorian Hayes (Canadian curator) This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or to the Eccles Centre This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Award: Up to 400 for travel and other expenses connected with the recipient's time spent in London working with the British Library collections.
No extra funding will be available from this source.  Candidates must ensure that they have sufficient funds to cover their own needs and the needs of any dependants during their period of research.
None of the organisations or individuals connected with this award are in a position to offer awards holders advise or help in matters of arranging accommodation or travel.
The award holder will be entitled to an award of up to 400 for travel and other expenses connected with the research visit to London.  The detailed administration of this award will be managed by the British Association for American Studies.
The award holder will agree to acknowledge the support provided by the Eccles Centre Visiting Professorship in any publication resulting from this research visit, and to inform the Eccles Centre of such publications.  If the opportunity arises, it is expected that the award holder will present their work at an appropriate Eccles Centre/British Library seminar or conference.

Applications should be in the form of a brief CV (no more than two pages), and a document explaining the nature of the North American Studies research being proposed at the British Library (no more than two pages).
FOUR Applications must reach Dr. Ian Scott, English and American Studies Subject Area, School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK by Friday January 26th, 2007 for research visits to take place in the period March-December 2007.  Applications by fax will not be accepted but email attachment will This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it so long as it conforms to the guidelines set out above.

4. GBS

Dad's in a coma. Two brothers reunite. Can Rich and Sam be civil long enough to survive the drive to hospital?

Fish Productions in association with THEATRE503 present the UK premiere of:
GBS by Jason Hall
Directed by Anna Ledwich
21 November - 9 December

Jason Hall's GBS is a touching and darkly hilarious chronicle of two brothers' attempts at reconciliation. Travelling the frozen streets of their youth, the skid into quick-fisted ex-wives, long forgotten lovers, and a lifetime of animosity as they search for the real meaning of GBS.
Box office: 020 7978 7040
THEATRE 503, Latchmere Pub, 503 Battersea Park Road, London SW11 3BW
www.theatre503.com
Tickets 12/7
Tuesdays: Pay-What-You-Can
Tuesday-Saturday @ 8pm
Sunday @ 5pm


5. Stages and Screens : Ideas About Representation
Nouvelles vues sur le cin
qucois no 8, Fall 2007

Jean Cocteau once said that: Theatre and film turn their backs to each other. Film and theatre in Quebec have developed along distinct paths that have, each in their own ways, shaped the provinces social imaginary and the way the world thinks about Quebec. Theatre Studies and Film Studies rarely have a chance to exchange and reflect on their common ground. Rather, discussions seem limited to an evaluation of the fidelity of a filmed adaptation to the source play. This issue of Nouvelles  vues sur le cin qucois would like to explore the relationship of theatre and film through interdisciplinary approaches, examining what brings them closer and what sets them apart. 

Topics may include (but are not limited to):
        The meaning of time in theatre and film
        Stage space vs screen space
        Film adaptations of Qu
cois plays
        Intertextuality
        The reception of film and theatre
        The body of the actor
        Performing for the stage, performing for the screen
        (Re)writing: the mise-en-s

        Showing as discourse
        Telling a story: stage narratives, screen narratives
        Robert Lepages cinema and theatre
        The usage of cinema in theatre
        Michel Lemieux and Victor Pilon: mixmedia in 4D
        Political theatre and film: changing Quebec
        Going to the Theatre: the buildings and their role in the communities

We accept original proposals (as email attachment) from researchers, students and filmmakers (approx. 200 words), in French or English, before January 15, 2007. Final texts must be submitted by July 15 2007 at the latest. All texts will be peer reviewed.

Nouvelles vues sur le cin
qucois
URL: www.cinema-quebecois.net
Email : This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


6. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
Forthcoming themed issue (Volume 9 Number 3, 2006)

The Editor is pleased to announce the forthcoming themed issue of the International Journal of Francophone Studies, Volume 9, Number 3 (Autumn 2006) on 'Linguistic and Cultural Contact and Conflict in Francophone Canada', guest edited by Dr Rosemary Chapman (Reader at the University of Nottingham). The situation of the French language in Canada is in many ways similar to that experienced by the francophone population in other former colonies throughout the world. Yet in crucial ways, the linguistic and cultural context of Francophones in Canada is quite distinct because of a number of geographical, historical and demographic factors. Complex and shifting patterns of contact and conflict have occurred between languages and cultures as a result of the francophone population's ambivalent position as 'colons colonis
after the British defeat of French troops in 1759. Whether as the linguistic majority in Quebec, or as linguistic minorities across the breadth of Canada, Francophones have had not only to contend with the domination of the English language, but also to coexist with a very diverse allophone population including the First Nations and a growing number of immigrant communities. In the late Twentieth Century and in the early years of the new millennium, those patterns continue to develop in the context of confrontation, of coexistence and of interaction between majority and minority communities. As colonisation and immigration have given way to globalization, so the modes of contact with the Other are changing. The idea behind this Special Issue was to focus on a variety of cases of the contact and conflict between languages and cultures that exemplify the specificity of the position of Francophones in Canada. The invited contributors have responded to this topic each from their own field, of linguistics, literary, and cultural studies. They have drawn on a range of methodological and theoretical approaches, including sociolinguistics, translation studies, postcolonialism, and postmodernism. What has emerged is a collection of articles which open up different ways of conceptualising cultural and linguistic contact, collision and exchange. The precise subject matter ranges from the theatre of Robert Lepage to la transculture, from literary translation to the representation of the indigene, from l'iture migrante to language legislation and policy. To what extent can one argue that traditional models of linguistic and cultural domination and assimilation are being replaced with a much more subtle and complex web of interaction and reciprocity?

EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION
        by Rosemary Chapman (University of Nottingham) Linguistic and Cultural Contact and Conflict in Francophone Canada

ARTICLES
1. The Challenges of Linguistic Duality for Francophone Canada: contact, conflict and continuity 
        Maeve Conrick (UCC, National University of Ireland, Cork)
2. Translating Difference: Gabrielle Roy's Inuit Stories in French and English 
        Rosemary Chapman (University of Nottingham)
3. La repr
ntation ambivalente de l'Autochtone dans le roman qucois: vers une perspective postcoloniale 
        Sandra Hobbs (Wayne State University in Detroit, MI, USA)
4. Transculturalism, Postcolonial Identities, Religiosity in Lalonde's Sept lacs plus au Nord and Tostevin's Frog Moon
        Marie Vautier (University of Victoria, British Columbia)
5. The Bridge of Reversals: Translation and Cosmopolitanism in Montreal 
        Sherry Simon (Concordia University, Montreal)
6. Staging the/an Other: The Dragons' Trilogy Take II
        Jane Koustas (Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario)

Kamal Salhi
Editor, International Journal of Francophone Studies 
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/ppjournals.php?issn=13682679

 


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(C) 2009 British Association for Canadian Studies